Navigation Menu+

Q

Q The seventeenth letter of the English alphabet. It has but one sound, which is the same as that of k, or c hard. It is, therefore, a superfluous letter. It is always followed by a u, the two letters together being pronounced like kw, except in some words in which the u is silent; as, quake, quack, pique, pronounced kwake, kwack, peek. The English name of the letter, cue, is said to be from the French queue, a tail, the form being the same as that of O with a tail added. — Webster, 1882
     

Click on an image below to learn more.

Quaker meeting

Quaker meeting

quarter section / quarter-section

quarter section / quarter-section

Queen of the May

Queen of the May

Albert Quiner

Albert Quiner

Quiner graves

Quiner graves

Henry O. Quiner family

Henry O. Quiner family

Thomas Quiner

Thomas Quiner

quinine

quinine

     


     

Wait, there’s more!
The following is an incomplete list of the remaining indexed main headings. Once a completed entry has been uploaded, it will be removed from the list below and added to the links above. Subheadings, reference locators, and cross-referenced subentries are not included in this list. Always consult the completed entry for referenced source of definition used below.

     

quarry – A place, cavern, or pit, where stones are cut from the earth for building or other purposes; a stone-pit.

queen – The consort of a king. A woman who is the sovereign of a kingdom; a female monarch; as, Elizabeth, queen of England; Mary, queen of Scotland.

queer – Going athwart what is usual or normal; differing in some odd way from what is ordinary; odd; singular; quaint; whimsical; as a queer story or act.

quicksand – Sand easily moved or readily yielding to pressure; especially, a large mass of loose or moving sand mixed with water, sometimes found at the mouth of a river or along some coasts, and very dangerous.

quick-step march – A lively, spirited march.

quiltn. A cover or garment made by putting wool, cotton, or other substance, between two cloths, and sewing them together. v.t. To stitch together with some soft and warm substance between, or in the interior of; as a quilted bed-cover; a quilted coat. To sew with the stitch used in a quilt.

Charlotte & Henry Quiner – Laura’s maternal grandparents.