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copyright / permissions

copyright. The legal right which an author has in his own original productions, especially the exclusive right of an author to print, publish, and vend his own literary works, for his own benefit, during a certain period of time. This right may be had to maps, charts, engravings, and musical compositions, as well as in books. — Webster, 1882

permission. The act of permitting; allowance; formal consent; leave; license or liberty granted. — Webster, 1882

plagiarist / plagiarize. One who plagiarizes, or purloins the writings of another, and puts them off as his own; a plagiary. / To steal or purloin from the writings of another. To be guilty of literary theft. — Webster, 1882

Honestly, Mamabess, I don’t know why you don’t get Mr. Craig to take that woman to court for using your stories without your permission. Why, any person who plagiarizes deserves to be dragged into Big Slough and left there, tied up and face down. – Rose Wilder Lane, 1937

     
This website is registered copyrighted work. Please do not steal from us. This website is not in the public domain, and you must not plagiarize even if you’re a huge fan and you think Laura Ingalls Wilder wouldn’t have minded. That’s not how copyright works. Information that is made available to the public via the internet is not in the public domain by reason of its being publicly accessible.

If you’re a Little House fan visiting this website, welcome! We hope you enjoy the fact & fiction of Laura Ingalls Wilder. If you’re here because you want to create your own Laura Ingalls Wilder website or blog, that’s what this is, so you most emphatically do not have permission to copy, capture, cut, paste, re-post, reprint, rewrite, republish, pin, translate, host, or distribute this website content (including text, graphics, photographs, and code). If you have a Little House blog or website or social media account and you want to share a link to an individual page as part of a discussion or post, that’s fine, and pioneergirl[dot]com shout-outs are always appreciated.

If you’re a K-12 student of any age and working on a school project that will go no farther than your own home or classroom (i.e., it won’t ever be uploaded anywhere on the internet), you have permission to to use what you need as long as you include proper citation. Please realize there are some things here that we don’t have transfer rights for, yet we secured them legally in order to include the content on the website. You should always rely on your teacher or other physically-present-in-your-life educated adult for guidance about what is okay to do with stuff you find on the internet.

If you’re an adult and here because you’re writing a LIW biography or LH companion or guide or article or anything with for-profit print or digital publication in mind (including self-publication), please go away and do your own primary research; see paragraph one above. If you find yourself returning to this site multiple times for information or to “look something up” and you haven’t been in touch with us personally about your project, you’re harvesting and you need to stop. If don’t have a clue what we mean by harvesting, now would be a good time to email.

If you are writing something for publication that is not Laura Ingalls Wilder specific and you find information here that you want to mention, source citation is necessary. HERE is a great site that can help you generate the proper wording. The decision was made to hide original post dates on entries on this blog/website, but that information is associated with each entry and can be supplied.

While every effort has been made to provide accurate information, mistakes/typos do happen. This site is constantly evolving; corrections will be made as needed.

The Rose Wilder Lane quote at the top of this page is pure fiction. The photo is of the work table behind Nansie’s computer.

                                         — nansie, Jani, & Gina.

     

copyright statement